• 303.830.1839
08/04/2013

Employee Insurance. If you are insured, either through your employer or a retirement policy, read all of the policies; including disability policies, pertaining to chronic illness. If you do not understand your benefits, contact the personnel department or your financial planner. Be sure to find out if your insurance covers referral to a specialist in Parkinson's disease.

Private Insurance. If you are unemployed and you do not have coverage, you should look for the highest level of coverage that you can afford.

Medicare. If you are 65 or over, you will qualify for Medicare, but Medicare is also very complex. Visit the government’s official webpage on Medicare by clicking here.

There are also options to supplement this insurance with a "Medigap" policy available through a private insurer. Visit the official Medicare site.

If you are disabled but too young to qualify for Social Security, you may be eligible to receive Social Security Disability.

Medicare prescription drug coverage To get Medicare drug coverage, you must join a plan run by an insurance company or other private company approved by Medicare. Each plan can vary in cost and drugs covered. To learn more about prescription drug coverage go to the official Medicare Site.

Medicaid. If you cannot get insurance and your income is low, you may qualify for Medicaid, a government "safety net" program that pays for medical costs that exceed a person's ability to pay.

Help is a phone call away! 303-861-1810

07/10/2013

If you have quit your job because you are no longer able to work and aren’t eligible for social security, you may be eligible for social security disability (SSD). You must have worked worked long enough, recently enough and paid social security taxes to qualify for SSD.

What is a disability?

For the purpose of SSD, you are considered to be disabled if

  • You cannot do work that you did before;
  • You cannot adjust to other work because of your medical condition(s); and
  • Your disability has lasted or is expected to last for at least one year or to result in death.

Parkinson’s disease is a covered disability assuming you meet the above requirements.

Qualifying

There is a three-step process when determining if someone with Parkinson’s disease qualifies for SSDI:

  • Determine if an individual is working according to the SSA definition. Earning more than $1,000 a month as an employee is enough to be disqualified from receiving benefits.
  • Conclude the Parkinson's disease disability must be severe enough to significantly limit one’s ability to perform basic work activities needed to do most jobs.
  • Parkinson’s is listed under the category of impairments known as neurological. If the following criteria are met, an individual is found to be disabled: significant rigidity, bradykinesia, or tremor in two extremities, which, singly or in combination, result in disturbance of gross and dexterous movements, or gait and station.

Know your SSD benefits

Visit the U.S. government website for information about social security disability

What you need to know about the benefits you are receiving click here.

Medicare

Medicare is complex. Visit the government’s official webpage on Medicare by clicking here.

Medicare prescription drug coverage

To get Medicare drug coverage, you must join a plan run by an insurance company or other private company approved by Medicare. Each plan can vary in cost and drugs covered.
To learn more about prescription drug coverage go to the official Medicare Site

07/10/2013

Plan for the future

Long-term care is a range of services and supports you may need to meet your health or personal care needs over a long period of time. Most long-term care is not medical care, but rather assistance with the of everyday life such as:

Basic personal tasks
Bathing
Dressing
Toileting and incontinence care
Eating

Everyday living tasks
Housekeeping
Money management
Medication management
Meal preparation
Shopping
Caring for pets

Types of Long Term Care

Home care helps individuals live independently for as long as possible. It covers a wide range of services, medical and non-medical and can often delay the need for moving to a long term care community. Home care agencies are divided into medical and non-medical home health.

Community services are support services that can include adult day care, meal programs, senior centers, transportation and other services. These can help people who are cared for at home as well as their families.

Supportive housing programs offer low-cost housing to individuals with low to moderate incomes. The Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and State or local governments may offer these programs. Residents generally live in their own apartments and may receive help with personal and everyday living tasks.

Assisted living provides 24-hour supervision, assistance, meals and health care services in a home-like setting. Residents may have a small apartment or room of their own with a bathroom. Size and costs of these communities is highly variable.

Continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) provide a full range of services and care based on what each resident needs over time. Care usually is provided in one of three main stages: independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing. .

Long Term Care Communities (Nursing homes) offer care to people who cannot be cared for at home or in the community. They provide skilled nursing care, rehabilitation services, meals, activities, help with daily living and supervision.

Find long term care services where you live.

Help is a call away! 303-861-1810

07/10/2013

Plan for your future

Long-term financial planning is important for everyone -- but it is essential if you are coping with the expense of a chronic illness, such as Parkinson's disease.

Develop a Financial Plan. Dealing with a chronic illness is unpredictable; there is no way to know how you will feel or what you will be able to do days, months, or years from now. For your own security you need to plan ahead. Assume that Parkinson's will lead to increasing disability. There are professional financial managers and lawyers that provide financial planning for people with chronic illnesses.

Employee Insurance. If you are insured, either through your employer or a retirement policy, read all of the policies, including disability policies, pertaining to chronic illness. If you do not understand your benefits, contact the personnel department or your financial planner. Be sure to find out if your insurance covers referral to a specialist in Parkinson's disease.

Private Insurance. If you are unemployed and you do not have coverage, you should look for the highest level of coverage that you can afford.

Medicare. If you are 65 or over, you will qualify for Medicare. You can supplement this insurance with a "Medigap" policy available through a private insurer. Visit the official Medicare site.

If you are disabled but too young to qualify for Social Security, you may be eligible to receive Social Security Disability.

Medicaid. If you cannot get insurance and your income is low, you may qualify for Medicaid, a government "safety net" program that pays for medical costs that exceed a person's ability to pay.

Help is a phone call away! 303-861-1810

07/10/2013

Understand how it works

If you have purchased private disability insurance or have benefits under a group insurance plan provided by your employer, you may be entitled to benefits. Disability policies generally pay whenever you cannot work as the result of an illness or injury.

If you do not have a private disability policy and you have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, it is to late to purchase a policy. In order to purchase cover you are required to provide evidence of good health.

Check with your insurance provider for the types of benefits available.
Download this form to assist you with documenting the symptoms which interfere with your work.
If you do not have private disability insurance, Social Security Disability Insurance pays benefits to you and certain members of your family if you are "insured," meaning that you worked long enough and paid Social Security taxes.